Governing Documents

New FiPHO Score Rates Association Health and Efficiency

The reserve study company Association Reserves Inc. has launched a new score intended to distill the overall health and efficiency of a community association into a single number. The so-called FiPHO — which stands for financial, physical, and operational — health score ranges from 1 to 100. “This new system is a direct result of…

Will a New Rating System Help — or Hurt — Your Clients?

The reserve study company Association Reserves Inc. has launched a new score intended to distill the overall health of a community association into a single number. The so-called FiPHO — which stands for financial, physical, and operational — health score ranges from 1 to 100. “This new system is a direct result of the Surfside…

The Risks of Enforcement Overexuberance at Your Community Association

Associations are making headlines across the country — and not in a good way. Stories about the overly aggressive pursuit of fines, fees, and foreclosures are going viral on a regular basis. “You want responsible patrolling to maintain property values,” says Alan Garfinkel, founding partner of Garfinkel Law, a full-service community association law firm in…

Are Your Community Association Rules a Ticking Time Bomb?

Times change, but often community association rules don’t. If your rules get out of date, they could become a ticking time bomb representing unnecessary risk that could blow up at any moment into a costly lawsuit or dispute. “Rules should be reviewed on a regular basis, and, in my experience, they aren’t,” says Alan Garfinkel,…

How and Why Your Association Clients Should Regularly Review Their Rules

Times change, but often association rules don’t. Here’s why and how your clients should conduct regular reviews of their rules. The Need for Review “Rules should be reviewed on a regular basis, and, in my experience, they aren’t,” says Alan Garfinkel, founding partner of Garfinkel Law, a full-service community association law firm in Florida. Regular…

What Can Your Association Do When Owners Build Structures That Violate Covenants?

When owners go ahead with new construction that’s prohibited by restrictive covenants, it can leave association boards at a loss. Often, they’re skeptical that a court will go as far as to order the destruction of an offending structure. But a recent case out of Michigan proves otherwise, and our experts say it’s happening in…

Court OKs Demolition of Construction That Violated Covenants

When owners go ahead with new construction that’s prohibited by restrictive covenants, boards can be at a loss. Often, they’re skeptical that a court will order the destruction of an offending structure. A recent case out of Michigan proves otherwise (Sgriccia v. Walsh). Deconstructing the Case “Lately, there seemingly is a whole undercurrent of people…

Up in Smoke: Association Management Issues in the Age of Marijuana Legalization

Up in Smoke: Association Management Issues in the Age of Marijuana Legalization - report cover

More than 60 percent of American states have legalized some form of marijuana since 1996, and the legislatures in many of the holdouts have recently considered doing so. Those states with legal marijuana have seen it rapidly commoditized, with new businesses such as delivery services cropping up and becoming a part of homeowners’ daily lives.

Not surprisingly, the proliferation of pot has begun to have repercussions for community association managers, both as property managers and employers. Whether you live in a state where marijuana is fully legal, partially legal, or on the cusp of some degree of legalization, you need to know what that means on the ground.

This Special Report takes an in-depth look at some of the most pressing marijuana-related issues for community association managers and their clients and provides expert guidance on how to mitigate the associated risks.

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Voter Apathy Not Necessary to Have Court Amend Voting Rules

In California, associations that can’t get a popular CC&R amendment passed because of supermajority voting requirements have another option — they can ask a court to amend the voting requirement to make it less onerous. A common question in such situations is whether an association must show voter apathy before a court can act. In…

Court Petition to Amend CC&Rs without Required Votes Needn’t Show Voter Apathy

California law lets an association turn to the courts to change the percentage of votes required to amend its CC&Rs, a helpful provision when communities have trouble reaching a super-majority. Opponents may claim that an association has to prove “voter apathy” to go this route, but a state court of appeals has made clear that…