Tag: Hiring & Staffing

How to Establish a Waste Reduction & Recycling Program

By Carolyn Zezima, Esq.

How to Improve Indoor Air Quality

By Carolyn Zezima

Require Employees to Get Authorization Before Commenting About Accidents, Incidents

A large part of the day-to-day management of a community is providing service, in a friendly and polite manner that comports with a major point of living in an association—being part of a pleasant environment. You’ve probably trained your staff to make homeowners and their guests feel comfortable. So when there’s an accident or other incident in your community, they might have an instinct to comfort the victim. While employees should rush to find help, there are several missteps they can take that can create major liability for the association.

Make Sure Governing Documents Spell Out Responsibilities

It’s important to make sure that your governing documents spell out exactly the expectations for members—especially when it comes to financial responsibilities. An association prevailed in a recent case in Pennsylvania because its covenants specified what owners were obligated to pay for. When a homeowner balked at this, the association was able to show that it was mandatory to pay certain fees.

Failure to Read Covenant Not an Excuse for Shirking Assessments

Facts: A homeowners association alleged that a homeowner breached the covenant to pay assessments for common area maintenance and other services necessary to operate the community. He had unpaid dues totaling over $15,000. The homeowner contested the reasonableness of the charges. The association asked a trial court for a judgment in its favor without a trial.

Decision: A Pennsylvania trial court ruled in favor of the association.

Tread Carefully When Revealing Information About Former Employees

It’s typical for the prospective new employer of one of your former employees to call for a reference. If the employee in question was a stellar part of your management team, it’s a no-brainer. A glowing report will most likely be appreciated by the former employee. But what should you do when you’re asked for a reference for someone who was not a good employee, or worse, was fired?

Interview Tips to Make Better Hiring Decisions

No matter what industry you work in, finding and hiring good employees is difficult. While the economy has recovered, there are still many jobseekers who apply for jobs that they are unqualified for, just because they need employment. And a candidate who seemed like a good choice for your community might end up not having the experience or attitude that’s necessary to help manage an association.

Rate Employment Applicants on Key Criteria Before Hiring

No matter what industry you work in, finding and hiring good employees is difficult. While the economy has recovered, there are still many jobseekers who apply for jobs that they are unqualified for, just because they need employment. And a candidate who seemed like a good choice for your community might end up not having the experience or attitude that’s necessary to help manage an association.

Set Up Referral Program for Employee Hiring Process

Hiring and retaining good employees—who are essential to effective management—can be hard. Some unqualified applicants might want the job simply because they need a salary. If you already have conscientious management team members, use them as a resource by implementing an employee referral program that pays them for referring job candidates whom you hire.

Get Control Over Employees’ Online Activities During Workday

Social media, email, and the Internet have vastly improved some aspects of business. Your association may have a website or use Facebook or Instagram to promote the benefits of living in the community or condominium building you manage or to post pictures of community events. But when employees spend work hours sending personal emails, going online to shop, or checking their social media channels, it leads to a decrease in productivity.